Economic & Societal Structure Issues

Posted on October 2, 2017

Children in foster care have the odds stacked against them as they transition into adulthood. Lacking the financial and moral support that most Canadian children take for granted, they struggle to cope with the challenges of adult life. As a result, children in foster care are far less likely to graduate from high school than the average Canadian and have a much greater likelihood of suffering from mental health problems. Chronic unemployment, unplanned parenthood, homelessness, and incarceration are just some of the problems they encounter, with significant social and economic costs as a result.

Child welfare agencies throughout the country work hard to ensure that the children’s basic needs are met while they are living in the care of the state. However, these agencies lack the resources necessary to help these children succeed as they “age out” of care. This briefing argues that there is both a humanitarian and a compelling economic case for action.

Success For All: Investing in the Future of Canadian Children in Care, (The Conference Board of Canada, April 2014)
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Canada lags when it comes to child hunger, violence: UNICEF ranking (CBC, July 2017)

Report shines light on poverty’s role on kids in CAS system (Toronto Star, August 2016)

Jury in Jeffrey Baldwin inquest puts onus for child welfare on the community (Metro News, February, 2014)

Inquest hears 103 recommendations to prevent another case like starved, neglected Jeffrey Baldwin (National Post, February 2014)

Children In Poorest Neighborhoods Most Vulnerable To Fatal Child Abuse (Huffington Post, April 2013)

UNICEF Child Well-Being Index: Canada Ranked 17th Out Of 29 Wealthy Nations (Huffington Post, 2013)

Adoption Attitudes Survey (Dave Thomas Foundation, 2013)